Tuesday, 27 November 2012

University of California, San Diego Uses TeraView's Instrument for Near-field Microscopy

University of California, San Diego Uses TeraView's Instrument for Near-field Microscopy

Cambridge, UK – 27th November, 2012
Georgia Institute of Technology - Lorraine
TeraView, the pioneer and leader in terahertz solutions and technology, has successfully delivered a TPS Spectra 3000 system to the Infrared Laboratory for Novel Infrared and Magnetic Materials at the University of California, San Diego, founded and let by Professor Dimitri Basov.
Professor Basov and his laboratory are world leaders in the use of optical and infrared methods to investigate the characteristic energies and physics of strongly correlated electron systems, magnetic semiconductors, superconductivity and other novel electromagnetic materials.  Prof Basov’s team will utilize the system for both routine characterisation of material systems at low temperatures, as well as a new project to develop a near-field microscopy system utilising terahertz time-domain techniques for spectroscopic measurements in ultra-high vacuum. TeraView has supplied a special breadboard version of its TPS Spectra 3000 time-domain terahertz spectrometer for the project.
Professor Basov is chair of the Department of Physics at the University of California at San Diego and has a long and substantive track record in the use of terahertz, infrared and optical methods applied to fundamental studies in condensed matter physics. He is a recipient of numerous prizes, including most recently the Frank Isakson Prize for Optical Effects in Solids from the American Physical Society in 2012.
This new project adds to TeraView’s growing installed base in the United States, and helps strengthen its position as the market leader for terahertz systems. Dr Don Arnone, TeraView’s CEO stated: ‘This collaboration with a prestigious research group highlights TeraView’s position as major supplier of terahertz systems and indicates the continued growth in the use of terahertz as a valuable tool for both fundamental physics as well as applications development in exciting areas such as terahertz microscopy'.